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L. P. Jacks

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The spirit of fellowship, with its attendant cheerfulness, is in the air. It is comparatively easy to love one's neighbor when we realize that he and we are common servants and common sufferers in the same cause. A deep breath of that spirit has passed into the life of England. No doubt the same thing has happened elsewhere.
--
"The Peacefulness of Being at War." in The New Republic (11 September 1915), p. 152

 
L. P. Jacks

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