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William Edward Hartpole Lecky

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The stately ship is seen no more,
The fragile skiff attains the shore;
And while the great and wise decay,
And all their trophies pass away,
Some sudden thought, some careless rhyme,
Still floats above the wrecks of Time.
--
On an old Song. Reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

 
William Edward Hartpole Lecky

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