Wednesday, November 22, 2017 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Rafal A. Ziemkiewicz

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[talking about word "homophobia":] I myself donīt like "gays" - and let me stress that I don't consider that word a synonym for "homosexual" - in the same way that I don't like Communists and Feminists as advocates of a harmful and stupid ideology. But have no fear of them.
--
Ziemkiewicz's essay at Interia Web Portal

 
Rafal A. Ziemkiewicz

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