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Helena Petrovna Blavatsky

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As Mr. Wallace justly observes, Hume's apothegm, that "a miracle is a violation of the laws of nature," is imperfect; for in the first place it assumes that we know all the laws of nature; and, second, that an unusual phenomenon is a miracle.
--
Chapter XII

 
Helena Petrovna Blavatsky

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