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Guy de Maupassant

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I took the book from him reverently, and I gazed at these forms incomprehensible to me, but which revealed the immortal thoughts of the greatest shatterer of dreams who had ever dwelt on earth.
--
"Beside Schopenhauer's Corpse"

 
Guy de Maupassant

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