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William S. Burroughs

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Never give anything away for nothing. 2. Never give more than you have to (always catch the buyer hungry and always make him wait). 3. Always take back everything if you possibly can.
--
On drug dealing, quoted in The Daily Telegraph (1964)

 
William S. Burroughs

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