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Werner Heisenberg

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The more precise the measurement of position, the more imprecise the measurement of momentum, and vice versa.
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Initial statement of the Uncertainty principle in "Über den anschaulichen Inhalt der quantentheoretischen Kinematik und Mechanik" in Zeitschrift für Physik, 43 (1927)
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Variant translation: The more precisely the position is determined, the less precisely the momentum is known in this instant, and vice versa.
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As quoted in "The Uncertainty Principle" at the American Institute of Physics

 
Werner Heisenberg

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I just want to explain what I mean when I say that we should try to hold on to physical reality.
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