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P. G. Wodehouse (1881 – 1975)


English comic writer who enjoyed enormous popular success during a career that lasted more than seventy years.
P. G. Wodehouse
Whatever may be said in favour of the Victorians, it is pretty generally admitted that few of them were to be trusted within reach of a trowel and a pile of bricks.
Wodehouse quotes
Aunt Agatha, who eats broken bottles and wears barbed wire next to the skin.
Wodehouse
I suppose this was really the moment for embarking upon an impassioned defence of Boko, stressing his admirable qualities. Not being able to think of any, however, I remained silent.




Wodehouse P. G. quotes
[of Spode] He was, as I had already been able to perceive, a breath-taking cove. About seven feet in height, and swathed in a plaid ulster which made him look about six feet across, he caught the eye and arrested it. It was as if Nature had intended to make a gorilla and had changed its mind at the last moment.
Wodehouse P. G.
I’d always thought her half-baked, but now I think they didn’t even put her in the oven.
P. G. Wodehouse quotes
And she's got brains enough for two, which is the exact quantity the girl who marries you will need.
P. G. Wodehouse
... "someone tried to assasinate Lenin with a rewolwer. That is our (Russia's) great national sport, you see."
Wodehouse P. G. quotes
At five minutes to eleven on the morning named he was at the station, a false beard and spectacles shielding his identity from the public eye. If you had asked him he would have said that he was a Scotch business man. As a matter of fact, he looked far more like a motor-car coming through a haystack.
Wodehouse
His whole aspect was that of a man who has unexpectedly been struck by lightning.
Wodehouse P. G.
‘And shove him into a dungeon with dripping walls and see to it that he is well gnawed by rats.’
P. G. Wodehouse
Into the face of the young man who sat on the terrace of the Hotel Magnifique at Cannes there had crept a look of furtive shame, the shifty, hangdog look which announces that an Englishman is about to talk French. One of the things which Gertrude Butterwick had impressed on Monty Bodkin when he left for his holiday on the Riviera was that he must be sure to practise his French, and Gertrude’s word was law. So now, though he knew that it was going to make his nose tickle, he said:
‘Er, garçon.’
‘M’sieur?’
‘Er, garçon, esker-vous avez un spot de l’encre et une piece de papier—note papier, vous savez—et une envelope et une plume.’
The strain was too great. Monty relapsed into his native tongue.
‘I want to write a letter,’ he said. And having, like all lovers, rather a tendency to share his romance with the world, he would probably have added ‘to the sweetest girl on earth’, had not the waiter already bounded off like a retriever, to return a few moments later with the fixings.
‘V’la, sir! Zere you are, sir,’ said the waiter. He was engaged to a girl in Paris who had told him that when on the Riviera he must be sure to practise his English. ‘Eenk—pin—pipper—enveloppe—and a liddle bit of bloddin-pipper.’
‘Oh, merci,’ said Monty, well pleased at this efficiency. ‘Thanks. Right-ho.’
‘Right-ho, m’sieur,’ said the waiter.




P. G. Wodehouse quotes
I shuddered from stem to stern, as stout barks do when buffeted by the waves.
P. G. Wodehouse
Before my eyes he wilted like a wet sock.
Wodehouse quotes
On his good mornings, I don't suppose there are more than a handful of men in the W. 1 postal district of London swifter to spot oompus-boompus than Bertram Wooster, and this was one of my particularly good mornings. I saw the whole hideous plot.
Wodehouse P. G.
The Duke’s moustache was rising and falling like seaweed on an ebb-tide.
Wodehouse P. G. quotes
Honoria, you see, is one of those robust, dynamic girls with the muscles of a welterweight and a laugh like a squadron of cavalry charging over a tin bridge. A beastly thing to face over the breakfast table. Brainy, moreover.
P. G. Wodehouse
He trusted neither of them as far as he could spit, and he was a poor spitter, lacking both distance and control.
P. G. Wodehouse quotes
Stiffy was one of those girls who enjoy in equal quantities the gall of an army mule and the calm insouciance of a fish on a slab of ice.
P. G. Wodehouse
It was one of the dullest speeches I ever heard. The Agee woman told us for three quarters of an hour how she came to write her beastly book, when a simple apology was all that was required.
Wodehouse P. G.
I can't stand Paris. I hate the place. Full of people talking French, which is a thing I bar. It always seems to me so affected.


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