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John Forbes Nash

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Gradually I began to intellectually reject some of the delusionally influenced lines of thinking which had been characteristic of my orientation. This began, most recognizably, with the rejection of politically-oriented thinking as essentially a hopeless waste of intellectual effort.
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Autobiographical essay in Les Prix Nobel - The Nobel Prizes 1994 (1995) edited by Tore Frängsmyr

 
John Forbes Nash

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