Friday, December 14, 2018 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

John Erskine

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We really seek intelligence not for the answers it may suggest to the problems of life, but because we believe it is life,—not for aid in making the will of God prevail, but because we believe it is the will of God. We love it, as we love virtue, for its own sake, and we believe it is only virtue’s other and more precise name.
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pp. 26-27

 
John Erskine

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