Monday, December 17, 2018 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Gerard Manley Hopkins

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I am gall, I am heartburn. God's most deep decree
Bitter would have me taste: my taste was me;
Bones built in me, flesh filled, blood brimmed the curse.
Selfyeast of spirit a dull dough sours. I see
The lost are like this, and their scourge to be
As I am mine, their sweating selves; but worse.
--
I Wake and Feel the Fell of Dark, Not Day, lines 9-14

 
Gerard Manley Hopkins

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