Tuesday, September 26, 2017 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

D. T. Suzuki

« All quotes from this author
 

Prophecy is rash, but it may be that the publication of D.T. Suzuki's first Essays in Zen Buddhism in 1927 will seem to future generations as great an intellectual event as William of Moerbeke's Latin translations of Aristotle in the thirteenth century or Marsiglio Ficino's of Plato in the fifteenth.
--
Lynn Townsend White, Jr., "The Changing Canons of our Culture," in Lynn White, Jr., ed. Frontiers of Knowledge in the Study of Man. New York: Harper & Bros., pp. 304-305. 1956
--
Carl Jung, Foreword to D.T. Suzuki An Introduction to Zen Buddhism. New York: Grove Press, p.9. 1964 ISBN 0-8021-3055-0

 
D. T. Suzuki

» D. T. Suzuki - all quotes »



Tags: D. T. Suzuki Quotes, Authors starting by S


Similar quotes

 

Through Plato, Aristotle came to believe in God; but Plato never attempted to prove His reality. Aristotle had to do so. Plato contemplated Him; Aristotle produced arguments to demonstrate Him. Plato never defined Him; but Aristotle thought God through logically, and concluded with entire satisfaction to himself that He was the Unmoved Mover.

 
Edith Hamilton
 

In Plato and to a lesser extent in Aristotle we read that practical concerns are low and vulgar. It follows that business, as an inherently practical enterprise, is hardly worthy of esteem. Given the place of Plato and Aristotle on the intellectual landscape, we have a partial explanation of the disdain that members of the cultural elite have always exhibited toward business.

 
Plato
 

[Aristotle] was the most eminent of all the pupils of Plato.... He seceded from Plato while he was still alive; so that they tell a story that [Plato] said, "Aristotle has kicked us off, just as chickens do their mother after they have been hatched."

 
Plato
 

Suzuki's works on Zen Buddhism are among the best contributions to the knowledge of living Buddhism… We cannot be sufficiently grateful to the author, first for the fact of his having brought Zen closer to Western understanding, and secondly for the manner in which he has achieved this task.

 
D. T. Suzuki
 

[Aristotle] totally misrepresents Plato's doctrine of "Ideas." ... It is also pertinent to inquire, what is the difference between the "formal cause" of Aristotle and the archetypal ideas of Plato? ... Yet Aristotle is forever congratulating himself that he alone has properly treated the "formal" and the "final cause"!

 
Aristotle
© 2009–2013Quotes Privacy Policy | Contact