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Alfred Adler

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The Adlerians, in the name of “individual psychology,” take the side of society against the individual. ... Adler’s later thought succumbs to the worst of his earlier banalization. It is conventional, practical, and moralistic. “Our science ... is based on common sense.” Common sense, the half-truths of a deceitful society, is honored as the honest truths of a frank world.
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Russell Jacoby, Social Amnesia: A Critique of Conformist Psychology from Adler to Laing (1975), p. 23-25

 
Alfred Adler

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