Thursday, May 30, 2024 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Edmund Spenser (1552 – 1599)


English poet, who wrote such pastorals as The Shepheardes Calendar, Astrophell and Colin Clouts Come Home Againe, but is most famous for the multi-layered allegorical romance The Faerie Queene.
1 2 3
Edmund Spenser
The Faerie Queene is the most extended and extensive meditation on sex in the history of poetry. It charts the entire erotic spectrum, a great chain of being rising from matter to spirit, from the coarsest lust to chastity and romantic idealism. The poem’s themes of sex and politics are parallel: the psyche, like society, must be disciplined by good government. Spenser agrees with the classical and Christian philosophers on the primacy of reason over animal appetites. He looks forward to the Romantic poets, however, in the way that he shows the sex impulse as ultimately daemonic and barbaric, breeding witches and sorcerers of evil allure. Like the Odyssey, The Faerie Queene is a heroic epic in which the masculine must evade female traps or delays.
Spenser quotes
No daintie flowre or herbe that growes on grownd,
No arborett with painted blossoms drest
And smelling sweete, but there it might be fownd
To bud out faire, and throwe her sweete smels al arownd.
Spenser
The noblest mind the best contentment has.




Spenser Edmund quotes
Is not short paine well borne, that brings long ease,
And layes the soul to sleepe in quiet grave?
Sleepe after toyle, port after stormie seas,
Ease after warre, death after life does greatly please.
Spenser Edmund
O happy earth,
Whereon thy innocent feet doe ever tread!
Edmund Spenser quotes
For all that faire is, is by nature good;
That is a signe to know the gentle blood.
1 2 3
© 2009–2013Quotes Privacy Policy | Contact