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Ugo Cavallero

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I've been in contact with Marshal Badoglio. We agree that Italy must be saved from the abyss toward which Fascism is driving her. If we depose Mussolini, however, the new government should do nothing drastic to upset Hitler until we can secretly negotiate an armistice with the Allies.
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Quoted in "Improbable Heroes" - by Carl L. Steinhouse - History - 2005 - Page 104

 
Ugo Cavallero

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