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Norman Vincent Peale

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People become really quite remarkable when they start thinking that they can do things. When they believe in themselves they have the first secret of success.
--
Positive Thinking Every Day : An Inspiration for Each Day of the Year (1993), "April 13"
--
Earlier variant: People become really quite remarkable when they start thinking that they can do things. And those who have learned to have a realistic, nonegotistical belief in themselves, who possess a deep and sound self-confidence, are assets to mankind, too, for they transmit their dynamic quality to those lacking it.
--
?You Can If You Think You Can? (1987), p. 84

 
Norman Vincent Peale

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