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William Somerset Maugham

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It was not till quite late in life that I discovered how easy it is to say: "I don't know."
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p. 258

 
William Somerset Maugham

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Tags: William Somerset Maugham Quotes, Life Quotes, Authors starting by M


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"I am but as others: I am but what I was born to be."
"Do you recognize what you were born to be? Not only a nobleman, but a gentleman; not only a gentleman, but a man — man, made in the image of God. How can you, how dare you, give the lie to your Creator?"
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"I am but as others: I am but what I was born to be."
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"What has He given me? What have I to thank Him for?"
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