Wednesday, August 16, 2017 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Wu Kung-tsao (1902 – 1983)


Also spelled Wu Gongzao or Ng Gung Jou, was a Chinese tai chi chuan teacher of Manchu ancestry known for his literary contributions to and commentary on the tai chi classics in a general sense as well as describing unique characteristics of his family's Wu style tai chi chuan.
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Wu Kung-tsao
In tai chi chuan there is basic standing push hands, forward-backward push hands, d? l? and nine palace push hands, etc. In his later years, my older brother, Wu Kung-i (Wu Gongyi), created new techniques in applications. ... The d? l? method of stepping is also called ‘eight gates and five steps’ (b? mén w? b?).
Wu Kung-tsao quotes
Those with hard temperaments like to win through struggle; they don't like to be defeated. Inferior hard temperaments are explosive and rash, fierce and violent. Soft temperaments are placid and earnest. Inferior soft temperaments are weak-willed and do not seek a thorough understanding of the skills. Tai chi chuan stresses that hardness and softness complement each other. Training teaches one to be hard, but not excessively so, soft, yet not weak. This is to truly absorb the teachings.
Wu Kung-tsao
The body is divided into three parts and nine sections. The three parts are the spine, the two arms and the two legs.




Wu Kung-tsao quotes
There are six methods of winding silk energy: inner, outer, upper, lower, forward and backward. They are applied from anywhere on the body: the arms. legs, hips and waist, with the body moving continuously, with endless circularity, wrapped together like intertwined filaments of silk.
Wu Kung-tsao
Push hands is practiced between two people: the intitiator and the one acted upon. Initiating is called ‘asking’. The person acted upon ‘answers’. When the opponent asks, listen first before answering.
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