Tuesday, October 23, 2018 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Lewis Morris

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The victories of Right
Are born of strife.
There were no Day were there no Night,
Nor, without dying, Life.
--
The Ode of Evil, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

 
Lewis Morris

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