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Junius

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The least considerable man among us has an interest equal to the proudest nobleman, in the laws and constitution of his country, and is equally called upon to make a generous contribution in support of them whether it be the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct, or the hand to execute.
--
No. 37 (March 19, 1770)

 
Junius

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