Thursday, October 18, 2018 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

John Crowley

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It seems to him that he extends backwards (or is it forwards?) without beginning (or is it end?) and he can't just now remember whether the great tales and plots which he supposes he knows and forever broods on lie in the to-come or lie dead in the has-been. But then suppose that's how secrets are kept, and age-long tales remembered, and unbreakable curses made too.
--
Bk. 1, Ch. 4

 
John Crowley

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