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Horace Walpole

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Men are often capable of greater things than they perform. They are sent into the world with bills of credit, and seldom draw to their full extent.
--
As quoted in "The Works of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford" in The Monthly Review, or, Literary Journal, Vol. 27 (1798) edited by Ralph Griffiths, p. 187.

 
Horace Walpole

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