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Henri-Louis Bergson

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All the living hold together, and all yield to the same tremendous push. The animal takes its stand on the plant, man bestrides animality, and the whole of humanity, in space and in time, is one immense army galloping beside and before and behind each of us in an overwhelming charge able to beat down every resistance and clear the most formidable obstacles, perhaps even death.
--
Creative Evolution (1907), Chapter III. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1911, p. 271

 
Henri-Louis Bergson

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