Friday, November 22, 2019 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

George MacDonald

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But God lets men have their playthings, like the children they are, that they may learn to distinguish them from true possessions. If they are not learning that he takes them from them, and tries the other way: for lack of them and its misery, they will perhaps seek the true!
--
Donal Grant (1883).

 
George MacDonald

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