Thursday, June 27, 2019 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg

« All quotes from this author
 

The noble simplicity in the works of nature only too often originates in the noble shortsightedness of him who observes it.
--
H 1

 
Georg Christoph Lichtenberg

» Georg Christoph Lichtenberg - all quotes »



Tags: Georg Christoph Lichtenberg Quotes, Authors starting by L


Similar quotes

 

Just say "mister I'm sorry, I got no time to die, I'm too busy" and then turn and run like hell. If they say coward why don't pay any attention because it's your job to live not to die. If they talk about dying for principles that are bigger than life, you say "mister you're a liar. Nothing is bigger than life". There's nothing noble in death. What's noble about lying in the ground and rotting? What's noble about never seeing the sunshine again? What's noble about having your legs and arms blown off? What's noble about being an idiot? What's noble about being blind and deaf and dumb? What's noble about being dead? Because when you're dead, mister, it's all over. It's the end. You're less than a dog, less than a rat, less than a bee or an ant, less than a white maggot crawling around on a dungheap. You're dead, mister, and you died for nothing.

 
Dalton Trumbo
 

The grand style arises in poetry, when a noble nature, poetically gifted, treats with simplicity or with severity a serious subject.

 
Matthew Arnold
 

Generous, adj. Originally this word meant noble by birth and was rightly applied to a great multitude of persons. It now means noble by nature and is taking a bit of a rest.

 
Ambrose Bierce
 

Was it an intellectual consequence of this ‘rebirth,’ of this new dignity and rigor, that, at about the same time, his sense of beauty was observed to undergo an almost excessive resurgence, that his style took on the noble purity, simplicity and symmetry that were to set upon all his subsequent works that so evident and evidently intentional stamp of the classical master.

 
Thomas Mann
 

For pleasure is a state of soul, and to each man that which he is said to be a lover of is pleasant.... Now for most men their pleasures are in conflict with one another because these are not by nature pleasant, but the lovers of what is noble find pleasant the things that are by nature pleasant; and virtuous actions are such... Happiness then is the best, noblest, and most pleasant thing in the world, and these attributes are not severed as in the inscription at Delos: Most noble is that which is justest, and best is health; but pleasantest is it to win what we love.

 
Aristotle
© 2009–2013Quotes Privacy Policy | Contact