Monday, December 17, 2018 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Frederic Bastiat

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"If the natural tendencies of mankind are so bad that it is not safe to permit people to be free, how is it that the tendencies of these organizers are always good? Do not the legislators and their appointed agents also belong to the human race? Or do they believe that they themselves are made of a finer clay than the rest of mankind?"
--
The Law, par. L. 210.

 
Frederic Bastiat

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