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Frans de Waal

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I've argued that many of what philosophers call moral sentiments can be seen in other species. In chimpanzees and other animals, you see examples of sympathy, empathy, reciprocity, a willingness to follow social rules. Dogs are a good example of a species that have and obey social rules; that's why we like them so much, even though they're large carnivores.
--
Natalie Angier (2001-01-14). Confessions of a Lonely Atheist. The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved on 2008-07-20.

 
Frans de Waal

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