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Federico Fellini

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Talking about dreams is like talking about movies, since the cinema uses the language of dreams; years can pass in a second and you can hop from one place to another. It’s a language made of image. And in the real cinema, every object and every light means something, as in a dream.
--
As quoted in Rolling Stone no. 421 (1984)

 
Federico Fellini

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