Sunday, February 18, 2018 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Emily Bronte

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Don't you think Hindley would be proud of his son, if he could see him? Almost as proud as I am of mine. But there's this difference, one is gold put to the use of paving stones; and the other is tin polished to ape a service of silver. Mine has nothing valuable about it; yet I shall have the merit of making it go as far as such poor stuff can go. His had first-rate qualities, and they are lost rendered worse than unavailing.
--
Heathcliff (Ch. XXI).

 
Emily Bronte

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