Wednesday, December 19, 2018 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Doron Zeilberger

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Let me also remind you that zero, like all of mathematics, is fictional and an idealization. It is impossible to reach absolute zero temperature or to get perfect vacuum. Luckily, mathematics is a fairyland where ideal and fictional objects are possible.
--
"                  " (nothing) published in the Personal Journal of Shalosh B. Ekhad and Doron Zeilberger

 
Doron Zeilberger

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