Thursday, December 14, 2017 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Dora Read Goodale

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Whence is yonder flower so strangely bright?
Would the sunset's last reflected shine
Flame so red from that dead flush of light?
Dark with passion is its lifted line,
Hot, alive, amid the falling night.
--
Cardinal Flower, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 89.

 
Dora Read Goodale

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Be strong to hope, O Heart!
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Now I tell what is very strong magic. I woke in the midst of the night. When I woke, the fire had gone out and I was cold. It seemed to me that all around me there were whisperings and voices. I closed my eyes to shut them out. Some will say that I slept again, but I do not think that I slept. I could feel the spirits drawing my spirit out of my body as a fish is drawn on a line.
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