Thursday, November 26, 2020 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Dinah Maria Mulock

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O infinitely human, yet divine!
Half clinging childlike to the mother found,
Yet half repelling as the soft eyes say,
"How is it that ye sought me? Wist ye not
That I must be about my Father's business?"

 
Dinah Maria Mulock

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The most important thing, my father told me, which I have never forgotten, and which I have often put unto practice was: If you get into a quarrel with anybody, hit him first. "If you hit first, the battle is half-won," my father always said "Don't let him hit first. You hit him first."
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