Tuesday, August 09, 2022 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

David Lynch

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I love child things because there's so much mystery when you're a child. When you're a child, something as simple as a tree doesn't make sense. You see it in the distance and it looks small, but as you go closer, it seems to grow you haven't got a handle on the rules when you're a child. We think we understand the rules when we become adults but what we really experienced is a narrowing of the imagination.

 
David Lynch

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If you wish to be like a little child, study what a little child could understand nature; and do what a little child could do love.

 
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