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Bjarne Stroustrup

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The connection between the language in which we think/program and the problems and solutions we can imagine is very close. For this reason restricting language features with the intent of eliminating programmer errors is at best dangerous.
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Bjarne Stroustrup's The C++ Programming Language (Third Edition and Special Edition) Notes to the Reader page 9. Retrieved on 2012-04-28.

 
Bjarne Stroustrup

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