Monday, December 11, 2017 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Arthur Symons

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They pass upon their old, tremulous feet,
Creeping with little satchels down the street,
And they remember, many years ago,
Passing that way in silks. They wander, slow
And solitary, through the city ways,
And they alone remember those old days
Men have forgotten.
--
The Old Women, st. 1

 
Arthur Symons

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