Tuesday, October 20, 2020 Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

Anthony Stafford Beer

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Certain management policies-stretching of credit resources, for example-may lead to great progress in good conditions; but, like the Grand Prix car in comparison with the Land Rover, they may not be robust enough to survive when the going gets tough.
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p. 88

 
Anthony Stafford Beer

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